Fezzik In Paris

Two Americans, three cats, and too many places named "de Gaulle"

I caved and bought the camera, a Nikon.

This provoked two internal, if multitiered, responses:

  1. Hey, I’ve got  a new camera
  • The shutter actuation sound is strange (side effect of never having owned a non-Pentax SLR; the shutter sound was consistent between the film and digital versions)
  1. Let’s not think about that
  • That fisheye lens sitting in storage was how much? (according to Newegg they retail for the same as when I bought it five years ago, so maybe I can get something for it when we get back to the States, at least)

 

Tragically, I have yet to encounter any further culcita rancidus in their native biomes, so my plans for a coffee table book regarding subsepecies thereof have been thwarted.


Paris Museums seem to be on a bit of a Robert Mapplethorpe kick, so we’ve been on a bit of a Robert Mapplethorpe kick; the nominal plan for yesterday was to go to the Rodin museum just down the street in hopes of catching the Rodin/Mapplethorpe exhibit.

As we strolled up to the museum, however, we encountered a line. Not just any line, mind you, a tourist season line; the queue, coupled with the fact that they appeared to be restricting the number of people in the museum (normally a good thing, but not a good omen if you’ve just arrived), was such that we said “fuck it” and decided simply to wander.

It’s here that I feel it necessary to digress and extol the virtues of being an expatriate as opposed to merely visiting; while the people standing in line were likely to be constrained such that they could either stand in line or never see the Rodin museum, our current situation is such that we can estimate the probability that the Rodin museum will be there in the coming year (high), assess the duration for which we wanted to stand in line (not long), and finally, check our itinerary for seeing the sights (itinerary?).

Here are some of the pictures I took.

Look at us, we're in the 7th!

A street sign.

A garden barge. Yes, a garden planted on top of a brage, which is then apparently towed around and moored in random places along the river.

A garden barge. Yes, a garden planted on top of a barge, which is then apparently towed around and moored in random places along the river.

A lovely boat.

A lovely boat.

The Grand Palais.

The Grand Palais.

It only took a dozen or so pictures to get one with the damn flag waving.

It only took a dozen or so pictures to get one with the damn flag waving.

Tree out of nowhere.

Tree out of nowhere.

Preparations for Monday.

Preparations for Monday (Bastille Day).

Slightly closer view. The President reviews the troops from this stand (located in the middle of Place de Concorde).

Slightly closer view. The president reviews the troops from this stand (located in the middle of Place de Concorde).

Along the Champs-Élysées. No clue as to how one goes about getting seats, but we're planning on getting those small French flags and waving them like de Gaulle himself is coming down the road.

Along the Champs-Élysées. No clue as to how one goes about getting seats, but we’re planning on getting those small French flags and waving them like de Gaulle himself is coming down the road.

Per the Purrito: "An interesting juxtaposition of the old and the new"

Per the Purrito: “An interesting juxtaposition of the old and the new”

I hate Laplace transforms.

I hate Laplace transforms.

Where Velibs go to die.

Where Velibs go to die.

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